For nearly half a century, ski boots have been made and fitted the same way. They fit everyone and, because of that, no one. In fact, many skiers would agree that ski boots are often the most painful part of skiing. Bad boots can ruin a day on the hill. Fortunately the techs at Surefoot can offer helpful tips that can ease the pain or discomfort often associated with ski boots. While there are simple changes you can make to your current ski boots to solve discomfort, these are also warning signs that tell you it’s time to buy new boots.

Aching/cramping. When boots are not fitting correctly, they can inhibit blood flow to feet or cause you to overtighten the buckles, which can cause cramping and aches. Custom Orthotics often can resolve issues related to cramping.

Bruised toes. This common problem usually originates from boots that are too big or too tight in the toe. Skiing technique also can be to blame. All too often skiers are sitting in the back seat, which pushes toes to the front of the boot and causes bruising. Become more aware of backseat skiing by making sure you feel slight pressure on your shins from the tongues of your boots; this indicates that you are skiing forward. The problem of bruised toes often can be solved by a toe box expansion on current or new boots.

Shin bang. A common and painful problem for many skiers, shin bang occurs when the ski boot is not holding the foot in the boot properly. Usually a ski boot that is too big will not hold the foot in the boot’s heel pocket properly. When your foot flexes forward, only some parts of your shin will hit the boot’s tongue, causing pain in those areas. Shin bang is difficult to fix when a ski boot is not fitting properly, and it’s strongly recommended to get a new ski boot or liner.

Boots are not allowing you to improve. We often hear this complaint from skiers, and it immediately tells us the boots do not fit correctly. A properly fitting ski boot will allow the skier to stand in an upright and more natural position, which makes skiing easier and gives the skier more control over his or her skis, thus improving skiing technique.

Cold feet. It’s winter and it’s going to be cold. But there are a few ways to make sure your feet are as warm as possible:

Socks. Wearing the right type of socks can help to ensure warmer feet. Wool is beneficial because it pulls moisture away from the foot, which helps to keep the foot dry and, thus, warmer. A common misconception is that thick socks will be warmer, but that depends solely on the fit of the boot. If it’s a loose boot, a thicker sock is OK; but in proper fitting boots, a thick sock will make the boot fit too tight and slow down circulation, making your feet cold.

Buckling boots correctly. Buckling boots incorrectly will obstruct circulation in your feet. If buckles are clamped down too tight around the calf or instep, blood flow will not circulate through feet properly.

Boot heaters. An obvious solution to cold feet is to have boot heaters installed in your ski boots. There are many brands of boot heaters available depending on what you are looking for in a heater.

While some of the tips above may improve the comfort of your ski boots, one of the best options to ensure the optimal fit is to get yourself a pair of Surefoot Custom ski boots. An ability-specific shell, customized liner and custom ski orthotic delivers the ultimate in ski boot fit that is unparalleled to any other ski boot. This winter, Surefoot is excited to introduce the most revolutionary product to enter the ski industry in years: the new Surefoot Contoura X1 Liner. This new liner offers the most precise fit that will drastically improve comfort and performance on the slopes.

This winter, make sure you are not skiing in painful boots. If you are experiencing any problems with your boots or have any questions about the Surefoot Custom ski boot, stop into the store at One Steamboat Place.

Don’t want to put down hundreds of dollars to buy custom ski boots? Rent ski boots from Fleischer Sport and we’ll make sure you’re skiing in comfort!